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Colour schemes

Page history last edited by Heather Durnin 9 years, 5 months ago

Colour Scheme Wheels Part 1: Art Lesson

Purpose:  Students will learn to organize colours in six well-known colour schemes. Then, students will apply their new knowledge and skill to a structured art exercise using tempera paint and brushes. Finally, students will study artwork created by others and identify colour schemes that were used. Suggestions will be offered for extended art activities.

Planning and preparation:Lead a class discussion about colour. Students at the intermediate level are expected to have a basic understanding of the colour wheel and value scale. The following resources will assist with teacher preparation and classroom discussions:

Click here to view a short video entitled Colour Theory for Elementary Students

 

Click here for a written explanation of Colour theory for Elementary Grades with printable resources

 

Students will learn about colour schemes by creating especially designed colour wheels with "windows" that allow specific groups of colours to show through. Start by selecting a pattern for a specific colour scheme. Descriptions of colour schemes and colour wheel patterns that you can print and photocopy on to card stock are provided below.

Students can create a different colour wheel for each colour scheme.

Use tempera paint. Wash brushes carefully between colours.

Paint primary, secondary and tertiary colours.

Allow the paint to dry.

Cut out the pattern pieces and the windows as shown.

Assemble with a head fastener to allow rotation.

Adding a cardboard backing with masking tape around the edges will increase durability.

Students can use their colour wheels to calculate colour schemes.

Using the colour wheel: A variety of colour wheels can be used to calculate specific colour schemes. Black, white or grey can be added to any of the colours shown through the windows on the colour wheel. Turn the wheel for variations. Students should use their colour wheels to help calculate colour schemes for the art exercise that follows, below.

 

Click below for colour wheel patterns that you can print and photocopy on to card stock

 

Monochromatic Colour Scheme Wheel Pattern

 

Complementary Colour Scheme Wheel Pattern

 

Analogous Colour Scheme Wheel Pattern

 

Split Complementary Colour Scheme Wheel

 

Double Split Complementary Colour Scheme Wheel Pattern

 

Triad Colour Scheme Wheel Pattern

 

Part 2: Art Exercise

Creative work: Students should create a series of small paintings, each with the same simple subject matter and each with a different colour scheme (samples are shown below). The simple subject matter should have flat colours for this art exercise (no shading). Students should use tempera paint on card stock. For each painting, students should choose six colours from the range of colours included with each specific colour scheme and create a visual list of colours, as shown below. Optionally, a pattern can be printed and photocopied on to card stock. However, the subject matter of this art exercise can be integrated with other areas of study (e.g. the design for this sample integrates with social studies and history and was influenced by West Coast Native Canadian artwork).

Integration: To create a simple design suitable for the colour scheme exercise above, students should first research design work created by a variety of historical periods, styles and cultures. They should gather a small collection of related design ideas that inspire them from the internet, the library or magazines, etc. In a plan for their artwork, students should identify the sources of their artistic influences. The following design samples integrate with Canadian history.

The sample design was influences by West Coast Native Canadian artwork.

Students could research quilt patterns of the Canadian pioneers to find inspiration for their designs.

 

Monochromatic Colour Scheme: Use one colour from the hue scale. Add black, white or grey to that colour.

 

 

 

Complementary Colour Scheme: Select two complementary (opposite) colours from the hue scale. Add black, white or grey to those colours.

 

 

 

Analogous Colour Scheme: Select colours that are adjacent on the hue scale. Add black white or grey to any of these colours.

 

 

 

Split Complementary Colour Scheme: Select an analogous colour scheme. Add a small amount of the complementary colour. Add black, white or grey to any of these colours.

 

 

 

Double Split Complementary Colour Scheme: Select two complementary analogous colour schemes. Add black, white or grey to any of these colours.

 

 

 

Triad Colour Scheme: Select three colours that are equally spaced on the hue scale. Add black, white or grey to any of these colours.

 

Part 3: Art Extensions

Critical thinking:Students should use their colour wheels to analyze colour schemes that they see around them. Colour schemes are used in fashion design, interior decorating, product design, advertising, editorial design, fine art paintings and much more.

Extensions: The art exercises included in this section are very structured in order to facilitate learning; students are given the opportunity to explore and practice a new concept. Art extensions should be less structured to allow for higher creativity. Encourage students to consider and discuss colour schemes in new art projects of their choice.

 

 

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